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Long-term effect of yogic practices on diurnal metabolic rates of healthy subjects
International journal of yoga
Short Title: Int.J.Yoga
Format: Journal Article
Publication Year: 2008
Pages: 27 - 32
Sources ID: 32746
Notes: LR: 20170220; JID: 101313247; OTO: NOTNLM; 2011/08/11 06:00 [entrez]; 2008/01/01 00:00 [pubmed]; 2008/01/01 00:01 [medline]; ppublish
Visibility: Public (group default)
Abstract: (Show)
BACKGROUND: The metabolic rate is an indicator of autonomic activity. Reduced sympathetic arousal probably resulting in hypometabolic states has been reported in several yogic studies. AIM: The main objective of this study was to assess the effect of yoga training on diurnal metabolic rates in yoga practitioners at two different times of the day (at 6 a.m. and 9 p.m.). MATERIALS AND METHODS: Eighty eight healthy volunteers were selected and their metabolic rates assessed at 6 a.m. and 9 p.m. using an indirect calorimeter at a yoga school in Bangalore, India. RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS: The results show that the average metabolic rate of the yoga group was 12% lower than that of the non-yoga group (P < 0.001) measured at 9 p.m. and 16% lower at 6 a.m. (P < 0.001). The 9 p.m. metabolic rates of the yoga group were almost equal to their predicted basal metabolic rates (BMRs) whereas the metabolic rate was significantly higher than the predicted BMR for the non-yoga group. The 6 a.m. metabolic rate was comparable to their predicted BMR in the non-yoga group whereas it was much lower in the yoga group (P < 0.001). The lower metabolic rates in the yoga group at 6 a.m. and 9 p.m. may be due to coping strategies for day-to-day stress, decreased sympathetic nervous system activity and probably, a stable autonomic nervous system response (to different stressors) achieved due to training in yoga.