Skip to main content Skip to search
Displaying 51 - 75 of 874

Pages

  • Page
  • of 35
Why this expert says meditating can help people in their 70s, 80s and beyond

We can’t avoid all stress in our lives, but we can prevent it from seriously affecting us. That’s the goal of “Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction,” a practice developed at the University...

I never fully realized the magic of yoga until I started letting my youngest do yoga with me before bed. Without fail, she falls asleep almost immediately after doing yoga. Now that I've seen the light, I encourage all of my kids to participate in yoga. Admittedly, my type of class (vinyasa flow) isn't all that ... Read more >>

Beth Berila explores how contemplative learning, including mindfulness, can be used to incorporate anti-oppressive learning into the field of higher education. Berila illustrates how mindfulness can be used to interrupt and reframe harmful narratives about the perception of others in society at large.

This video captures a lecture from Myers to the International Institute of Integral Human Sciences on the use of biofeedback to manage meditation.

The processing of metallic mercury into the form of a mercury sulphide ash, called tsotel (btso thal), is considered the most refined pharmacological technique known in Tibetan medicine. This ash provides the base material for many of the popular “precious pills” (rin chen ril bu), which are considered essential by Tibetan physicians to treat severe diseases. Making tsotel and precious pills in Tibet’s past were rare and expensive events. The Chinese take-over of Tibet in the 1950s, followed by the successive reforms, including the Cultural Revolution (1966–1976), affected the opportunities to transmit the knowledge and practice of making tsotel. In this article, I discuss two Tibetan physicians, Tenzin Chödrak (1924–2001) and Troru Tsenam (1926–2004), both of whom spent many years in Chinese prisons and labour camps, and their role in the transmission of the tsotel practice in a labour camp in 1977, contextualising these events with tsotel practices in Central and South Tibet in preceding decades. Based on two contemporary biographies, their descriptions of making tsotel will be analysed as well as the ways in which the biographies depicted these events. I argue that the ways of writing about these tsotel events in the physicians’ biographies, while silencing certain lines of knowledge transmission, established an authoritative lineage of this practice. Both physicians had a decisive impact on the continuation of the lineage and the manufacturing of tsotel and precious pills from the 1980s onwards in both India and the People’s Republic of China (PRC).

<p>The Auspicious Beauty (Bkra shis mdzes ldan) is one of the seventeen Dzokchen tantras of the Esoteric Precept (man ngag sde) Class of Atiyoga.</p>

The Blissful Mind is your guide to finding calm in the everyday

This collection of essays on practice within traditional medicine systems in different cultures and continents, bracketed by unifying introductory and concluding chapters, is noted among its testimonies as a unique collection that provides an extremely good basis for comparative studies of global healing practices, a point with which I can wholeheartedly agree. Nearly all of the contributors are professors in their fields – anthropology, history, classics, nutrition – and they investigate the notion of balance and how this is to be maintained or restored by medical practice, both in the ‘Great Traditions’ of the East (Chinese medicine, Ayurveda) and the Greco-Arabic tradition of Hippocratic–Galenic medicine and Yunani Tibb, and in Tibetan medicine and Mesoamerican and East African healing practices. The ensuing full discussions of herbal and shamanic practices present a range of cultural constructs, detail some of the healing foods and herbs employed and offer analysis of the underlying epistemologies of their healing systems. The introduction to this set of essays, which sets out the problems in trying to navigate through the world's major systems of thought about the nature of health and the causes of disease, and its concluding chapter, which successfully links together the themes and findings of the studies mount a substantial and thought-provoking series of challenges to the established explanatory frameworks of medical historians and anthropologists.

This guided meditation from Jon Kabat-Zinn encourages a sense of awareness so you can notice all the sensations of your body.

Pages

  • Page
  • of 35