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An attempt was made to evaluate the effect of Sahaja yoga meditation in stress management in patients of epilepsy. The study was carried out on 32 patients of epilepsy who were rendomly divided into 3 groups: group I subjects practised Sahaja yoga meditation for 6 months, group II subjects practised postural exercises mimicking Sahaja yoga and group III served as the epileptic control group. Galvanic skin resistance (GSR), blood lactate and urinary vinyl mandelic acid (U-VMA) were recorded at 0, 3 and 6 months. There were significant changes at 3 & 6 months as compared to 0 month values in GSR, blood lactate and U-VMA levels in group I subjects, but not in group II and group III subjects. The results indicate that reduction in stress following Sahaja yoga practice may be responsible for clinical improvement which had been earlier reported in patients who practised Sahaja yoga.

An attempt was made to evaluate the effect of Sahaja yoga meditation in stress management in patients of epilepsy. The study was carried out on 32 patients of epilepsy who were rendomly divided into 3 groups: group I subjects practised Sahaja yoga meditation for 6 months, group II subjects practised postural exercises mimicking Sahaja yoga and group III served as the epileptic control group. Galvanic skin resistance (GSR), blood lactate and urinary vinyl mandelic acid (U-VMA) were recorded at 0, 3 and 6 months. There were significant changes at 3 & 6 months as compared to 0 month values in GSR, blood lactate and U-VMA levels in group I subjects, but not in group II and group III subjects. The results indicate that reduction in stress following Sahaja yoga practice may be responsible for clinical improvement which had been earlier reported in patients who practised Sahaja yoga.

Twenty Type 2 diabetic subjects between theage group of 30-60 years were studied to see the effect of 40 days of <i style="">Yoga</i> <i style="">asanas</i> on biochemical profile. The duration of diabetes ranged from 0 to 10 years. Subjects suffering from cardiac, renal and proliferative retinal complications were excluded from the study. <i style="">Yoga</i> <i style="">asanas</i> included <i style="">Surya Namaskar</i>, <i style="">Tadasan</i>, <i style="">Konasan</i>, <i style="">Padmasan</i>, <i style="">Pranayama</i>, <i style="">Paschimottanasan</i>, <i style="">Ardhmatsyendrasan</i>, <i style="">Shavasan</i>, <i style="">Pavanmuktasan</i>, <i style="">Sarpasan</i> and <i style="">Shavasan</i>. Subjects were called to the cardio-respiratory laboratory in the morning time and were given training by the <i style="">Yoga</i> expert. The <i style="">Yogic</i> exercises were performed for 30 - 40 minutes every day for 40 days in the above sequence. The subjects were prescribed medicines and diet. The basal blood glucose, lipid profile and glycosylated haemoglobin was measured and repeated after 40 days of <i style="">yoga asanas</i>. There was a statistically significant decrease in fasting blood glucose (from baseline 208.3 ± 20.0 to 171.7 ± 19.5 mg/dl) and decrease in Postprandial blood glucose (from 295.3 ± 22.0 to 269.7± 19.9 mg/dl). The decreases in values of serum cholesterol were also statistically significant (from 222.8 ± 10.2 to 207.9 ± 8.6 mg/dl). The triglyceride decreased (from 168.5 ± 15.5 to 146.3 ±13.5 mg/dl), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and very low-density lipoprotein improved (from 144.8 ± 8.6 to 140.70 ± 7.9 mg/dl and from 37.4 ± 4.6 to 32.1 ± 3.4 mg/dl). The glycosylated haemoglobin decreased from 10.27 ±0.5 to 8.68 ± 0.4 %. These findings suggest that <i style="">yoga asanas</i> have a beneficial effect on glycaemic control and lipid profile in mild to moderate Type 2 diabetes.

IMPORTANCE:Many people meditate to reduce psychological stress and stress-related health problems. To counsel people appropriately, clinicians need to know what the evidence says about the health benefits of meditation. OBJECTIVE: To determine the efficacy of meditation programs in improving stress-related outcomes (anxiety, depression, stress/distress, positive mood, mental health-related quality of life, attention, substance use, eating habits, sleep, pain, and weight) in diverse adult clinical populations. EVIDENCE REVIEW: We identified randomized clinical trials with active controls for placebo effects through November 2012 from MEDLINE, PsycINFO, EMBASE, PsycArticles, Scopus, CINAHL, AMED, the Cochrane Library, and hand searches. Two independent reviewers screened citations and extracted data. We graded the strength of evidence using 4 domains (risk of bias, precision, directness, and consistency) and determined the magnitude and direction of effect by calculating the relative difference between groups in change from baseline. When possible, we conducted meta-analyses using standardized mean differences to obtain aggregate estimates of effect size with 95% confidence intervals. FINDINGS: After reviewing 18 753 citations, we included 47 trials with 3515 participants. Mindfulness meditation programs had moderate evidence of improved anxiety (effect size, 0.38 [95% CI, 0.12-0.64] at 8 weeks and 0.22 [0.02-0.43] at 3-6 months), depression (0.30 [0.00-0.59] at 8 weeks and 0.23 [0.05-0.42] at 3-6 months), and pain (0.33 [0.03- 0.62]) and low evidence of improved stress/distress and mental health-related quality of life. We found low evidence of no effect or insufficient evidence of any effect of meditation programs on positive mood, attention, substance use, eating habits, sleep, and weight. We found no evidence that meditation programs were better than any active treatment (ie, drugs, exercise, and other behavioral therapies). CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE: Clinicians should be aware that meditation programs can result in small to moderate reductions of multiple negative dimensions of psychological stress. Thus, clinicians should be prepared to talk with their patients about the role that a meditation program could have in addressing psychological stress. Stronger study designs are needed to determine the effects of meditation programs in improving the positive dimensions of mental health and stress-related behavior.

Increasingly popular mindfulness intervention innovations seem demonstrably effective in alleviating anxiety among people with anxiety disorders. However, the basis of such primary and synthetic evidence has, for the most part, been comparisons with non-active comparison conditions such as waiting lists. The longest-standing and strongest evidence-informed practices in this field have been cognitive behavioral interventions (CBI). This meta-analysis synthesized evidence from nine randomized trials of the relative effectiveness of mindfulness interventions compared to CBIs (i.e., active control groups) in treating anxiety disorders. The sample-weighted synthesis found no statistically or practically significant differences between the two groups on anxiety alleviation: Cohen’s d = - 0.02 (95% confidence interval = - 0.16, 0.12). Both groups enjoyed large clinical benefits. However, because mindfulness methods may require less professional training and take less time for both workers and clients to master, they are probably less expensive to provide. As they are probably less expensive, but equally effective, it seems that, in a cost-beneficial sense, mindfulness interventions may be more practically effective. These review-generated meta-analytic findings and inferences may be best thought of as developed hypotheses for future research testing. These and other future research needs are discussed.

OBJECTIVES: 1. To study the effect of forty days of Yogic exercises on cardiac functions in Type 2 Diabetics. 2. To study the effect of forty days of Yogic exercises on blood glucose level, glycosylated hemoglobin. METHODS: The present study done in twenty-four Type 2 DM cases provides metabolic and clinical evidence of improvement in glycaemic control and autonomic functions. These middle-aged subjects were type II diabetics on antihyperglycaemic and dietary regimen. Their baseline fasting and postprandial blood glucose and glycosylated Hb were monitored along with autonomic function studies. The expert gave these patients training in yoga asanas and they pursued those 30-40 min/day for 40 days under guidance. These asanas consisted of 13 well known postures, done in a sequence. After 40 days of yoga asanas regimen, the parameters were repeated. RESULTS: The results indicate that there was significant decrease in fasting blood glucose levels from basal 190.08 +/- 18.54 in mg/dl to 141.5 +/- 16.3 in mg/dl after yoga regimen. The post prandial blood glucose levels decreased from 276.54 +/- 20.62 in mg/dl to 201.75 +/- 21.24 in mg/dl, glycosylated hemoglobin showed a decrease from 9.03 +/- 0.29% to 7.83 +/- 0.53% after yoga regimen. The pulse rate, systolic and diastolic blood pressure decreased significantly (from 86.45 +/- 2.0 to 77.65 +/- 2.5 pulse/min, from 142.0 +/- 3.9 to 126.0 +/- 3.2 mm of Hg and from 86.7 +/- 2.5 mm of Hg to 75.5 +/- 2.1 mm of Hg after yoga regimen respectively). Corrected QT interval (QTc) decreased from 0.42 +/- 0.0 to 0.40 +/- 0.0. CONCLUSION: These findings suggest that better glycaemic control and stable autonomic functions can be obtained in Type 2 DM cases with yoga asanas and pranayama. The exact mechanism as to how these postures and controlled breathing interact with somato-neuro-endocrine mechanism affecting metabolic and autonomic functions remains to be worked out.