Skip to main content Skip to search
Cluster-randomized trial demonstrating impact on academic achievement of elementary social-emotional learning
School Psychology Quarterly: The Official Journal of the Division of School Psychology, American Psychological Association
Short Title: Sch Psychol Q
Format: Journal Article
Publication Year: 2015
Pages: 406 - 420
Sources ID: 89846
Notes: Accession Number: EJ1167885; Sponsoring Agency: Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) (NIH); Acquisition Information: American Psychological Association. Journals Department, 750 First Street NE, Washington, DC 20002. Tel: 800-374-2721; Tel: 202-336-5510; Fax: 202-336-5502; e-mail: order@apa.org; Web site: http://www.apa.org; Language: English; Education Level: Elementary Education; Reference Count: 33; Journal Code: APR2018; Contract Number: RO1HD045362; Level of Availability: Not available from ERIC; Publication Type: Academic Journal; Publication Type: Report; Entry Date: 2018
Visibility: Public (group default)
Abstract: (Show)
This study evaluated the results of a social and emotional learning (SEL) program on academic achievement among students attending a large, urban, high-risk school district. Using a cluster-randomized design, 24 elementary schools were assigned to receive either the intervention curriculum (Promoting Alternative Thinking Strategies, or PATHS) or a curriculum that delivered few if any SEL topics (i.e., the control group). In addition to state mastery test scores, demographic data, school attendance, and dosage information were obtained from 705 students who remained in the same group from the 3rd to the 6th grade. Analyses of odds ratios revealed that students enrolled in the intervention schools demonstrated higher levels of basic proficiency in reading, writing, and math at some grade levels. Although these between-groups differences held for race/ethnicity, gender, and socioeconomic status, significant within-group differences also were noted across these variables. Collectively, these findings indicated that social development instruction may be a promising approach to promote acquisition of academic proficiency, especially among youth attending high-risk school settings. Implications of these findings with respect to SEL programs conclude the article.